40 Reasons Why It’s Cool to be a Catholic #32 Daily Mass

For the time being I’m going to take it for granted that Mass is cool.  We’ll get into why as we work our way up this top 40 list.  For now, let’s just say that the Mass, especially the reception of the Eucharist, is the heart and soul of our Catholic faith.  If Mass is cool, then being able to go to Mass every day is extra cool.

It wasn’t always possible to attend Mass on a weekday.  The early Church celebrated Mass only on Sundays and Holy Days.  It wasn’t until about 700 AD that daily mass was widely available.  For example, it’s believed that Saint Monica, who lived in the 4th Century, attended strangers’ funerals so she could partake of the Eucharist every day as she was prayed for her son Saint Augustine’s conversion

While we may not go to Mass everyday, isn’t it awesome that we can if we want to?  In most cities you can find a church or chapel where you can attend Mass at almost any time of day; in the morning, at lunch time, or even in the evening.  We can even attend daily Mass at Catholic hospitals, universities and other institutions.

Some of our protestant brothers and sisters are able to attend services on days other than Sunday, (When I was growing up in the Baptist tradition, we went to church on Sundays and Wednesdays).  But we not only have the opportunity to worship God in church every single day, we can also receive the Body and Blood of Christ on days other than Sunday.

We may choose to attend Mass every day or we may not.

But, being able to receive the Eucharist seven days a week is really cool.

 

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Saint Augustine on “The Lord’s Prayer”

I know it’s asking a lot for you to listen to me four times in one week, so I thought today we’d hear from Saint Augustine.  This is from a letter he wrote explaining why The Lord’s Prayer is the only prayer we really need.  Everything we can ask for is contained in the prayer that was taught to us by Jesus Himself.  Augustine writes:

For example, when one prays: “Be Thou glorified among all nations as Thou art glorified among us,” and “Let Thy prophets be found faithful,” what else does he ask than, “Hallowed be Thy name “?

When one says: “Turn us again, O Lord God of hosts, cause Thy face to shine, and we shall be saved,” what else is he saying than, “Let Thy kingdom come “?

When one says: “Order my steps in Thy word, and let not any iniquity have dominion over me,” what else is he saying than, “Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven “?

When one says: “Give me ne, neither poverty nor riches,” what else is this than, Give us this day our daily bread “?

When one says: “Lord, remember David, and all his compassion,” or, “O Lord, if I have done this, if there be iniquity in my hands, if I have rewarded evil to them that did evil to me,” what else is this than, “Forgive us our debts as we forgive our debtors “?

When one says: “Take away from me the lusts of the appetite, and let not sensual desire take hold on me,” what else is this than, “Lead us not into temptation”?

When one says: “Deliver me from mine enemies, O my God; defend me from them that rise up against me,” what else is this than, “Deliver us from evil “?

And if you go over all the words of holy prayers, you will, I believe, find nothing which cannot be comprised and summed up in the petitions of the Lord’s Prayer. Wherefore, in praying, we are free to use different words to any extent, but we must ask the same things; in this we have no choice.