40 Myths About the Catholic Church–The Church Hates Gays

I know you’ve heard this one many times.  As usual, this is not an in-depth study into the theology of the whole thing but to put it as simply as I can, the Church doesn’t hate anybody.  Here’s the thing.  You’ve probably heard the expression “Hate the sin but love the sinner.”  It definitely applies here. To understand where the Church stands on homosexuality, you have to look at the Church’s position on sexuality in general.  Sexual activity is reserved for men and women who have entered into a sacramental marriage.  For anyone, gay or straight, to engage in sex outside of marriage is a sin.

The Church does not discriminate between sinners based on with whom the sin is committed.  Two men, two women, a man and a sheep, or an unmarried man and unmarried woman (that is, not married to each other)  having sexual intercourse is a mortal sin.  The Church doesn’t hate any of them, she just hates the sin.

“OK, deacon, if that’s the case, why won’t the Church allow gay people to be married.”

The answer is simply that the sacrament of marriage was instituted by God for the creation of families.  In the prenuptial agreement signed by both parties, and in the sacrament itself, the man and the woman promise to be open to God’s gift of children.  That’s what marriage is for!  It’s the same reason she opposes artificial birth control.  We, as human beings, are not allowed to interfere with God’s plan.  “Be fruitful and multiply!”

“But deacon, what if two men or two women love each other?  Isn’t God all about love?”

Yes, Virginia, God is all about love.  In fact, God is love.  But the fact that we love someone doesn’t mean it’s ok to do whatever we want, whenever we want.  There are lots of kinds of love.  I love my wife, I love my kids, I love my grandkids, I love the Saint Louis Cardinals.  Obviously only one person in that list can share my bed.  There are other proper expressions of love that don’t involve sex.  Homosexuals are called to express their love in other ways.  They’re called to celibacy just as priests and religious are called to celibacy.

They’re part of God’s plan just as surely as heterosexual people are.  And God and His Church loves each of us.

Note:  I made a serious typo in this post.  I wrote “Sexual activity is reserved for men and men who have entered into a sacramental marriage.”  Obiously I should have written: “Sexual activity is reserved for men and women who have entered into a sacramental marriage.  Sorry for the typo and thanks to my most loyal reader, my lovely and talented sacramental wife for pointing out the error.

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