Times Square Rally

 

There was a big pro-life rally Sunday in Times Square in New York.  You probably aren’t aware of it because the main stream media couldn’t be bothered to cover it.  But my friend Carolyn covered it quite well in her blog and I’m sharing her post here because I think you should be aware of this event.

Caralyn also includes a video by Rep. Brian Sims.  Please watch it.  If this is the kind of person we’re electing to office, I’m afraid we’re doomed.  This guy is an embarrassment.

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5th Sunday of Lent

In the New American Bible, which is the Bible from which we get our Lectionary, today’s Gospel, Chapter 8 verses 1-11 is called “A woman caught in adultery.”  Jesus is teaching in the synagogue and our good friends, the scribes and the Pharisees show up dragging a woman who they have caught committing adultery. This incident raises a very real question.  Where is the man? They say she was caught “in the very act of adultery” but somehow they couldn’t find the man who was also participating; who was just as guilty. Obviously this is a test.

 

We’ve heard the story many times.  The punishment for adultery is stoning and Jesus says, “Let he who is without sin cast the first stone.”  What we don’t often hear is that no sooner had he said it than a rock came flying in from behind Jesus and hit the woman in the chest.  Thunk! Jesus turned around and looked and said, “Aw, Mom.”

 

Now, you may not like that joke.  Maybe you think humor has no place in religion.    But every time I look in the mirror and see myself looking back wearing s Roman collar, I know that God has a sense of humor.  It’s hard to imagine that someone who hung out with twelve other guys, and could turn water into wine, didn’t enjoy a good joke.

 

I spent seven years at Saint John Neopmuk Church in Soulard.  If I’d told that joke in a homily the Archbishop would have gotten letters (to go along with all the other letters he got about me.)  But the Czech culture is very serious. When they sing the Gloria in Czech, you’d swear you were at a funeral. But that’s just the way they are.  It took me a while to figure it out.

 

I think we’ve all heard this Gospel enough times that I can’t really add much to it, so I’m going to talk about what you just sang, the Responsorial Psalm.  We don’t preach on the Responsorial Psalm very often, but I think today, as we get ready to wrap up Lent, it might be a good time.

 

The Lord has done great things for us; we are filled with joy.

When the Lord brought back the captives of Zion, we were like men dreaming.  Then our mouth was filled with laughter and our tongue with rejoicing.

 

I think Father will agree with me that it’s not always easy to get Catholics to rejoice.  We don’t usually seem to be filled with joy. But, why the heck not? The Lord has done great things for us.  We’re alive and we’re living in the greatest country on earth.  You may or may not know that I just got back from a cruise to the Caribbean.  Every American should make a trip like that one time. When you see the poverty that exists just a few hundred miles from our shores you want to get down on your knees and thank God for what we have.  They may have beautiful weather but they don’t have much else. And they don’t show the tourists the really bad stuff.

 

The Lord has done great things for us; we are filled with joy.

This is the front page from today’s (yesterday’s) paper. ( I held up the front page of the Saint Louis Post Dispatch, which is copyrighted.  If you want to see it, you can look it up.) It’s a picture of Ozzie Smith waving to the crowd on opening day at Busch Stadium.  The headline reads:  “It’s a Holy Day of Obligation.”  Obviously, the headline writer hasn’t been inside a Catholic Church for a while.  It doesn’t look like this picture, either in the size or in the enthusiasm of the crowd on a Holy Day, or even on Sunday.;

 

Then they said among the nations, “The Lord has done great things for them.”  The Lord has done great things for us; we are glad indeed.

 

Those that sow in tears shall reap rejoicing.

 

Although they go forth weeping, carrying the seed to be sown, they shall come back rejoicing, carrying their sheaves.

 

[pause]

 

I want to close by looking back on the first reading from the book of Isiah.  Quoting God, Isiah says,
See I am doing something new.  Now it springs forth, do you not perceive it?  In the desert I make a way, in the wasteland, rivers.  Wild beasts honor me, jackals and ostriches, for I put water in the desert and rivers in the wasteland for my chosen people to drink, the people whom I formed for myself that they might announce my praise.”

 

We weren’t created to be gloomy and sad.  We were created to announce God’s praise so others could see us and want what we have.  We sing “Glory to God in the highest” and “hallowed be thy name” and give Him praise. The Lord has done great things for us and we are filled with joy.

 

8th Sunday of Ordinary Time

This is my homily for the 8th week of Ordinary Time.  We seldom have an 8th week because Lent has usually started by the first of March, but this year we do.  So enjoy some readings that you may not have heard in a while.  

We live in a world of sound bites.  CBS claims to have “real news”. Those two four letter words mean a lot more than their ordinary meaning.  Fox News is “fair and balanced”. I don’t think anybody, even their biggest fans, believe that they don’t lean to the conservative side.  Coca Cola is the “real thing” .  Here in Saint Louis hockey fans bleed blue and we shop at Carroll House because we like nice things. KMOX is “the voice of Saint Louis,” Commercials tell us not to smell like Walter.

 

We have a President who communicates in 140 character tweets.  And most of us carry a telephone around in our pockets or purses even though we may never actually talk to anyone.  If I want to meet my wife for lunch I’ll send her a text message: Lunch? And she’ll reply: ok. Where & when? I’ll text her back Chick-Fil-A @ 1:00.  And she’ll answer back: ok. Seven words and two characters, assuming “ok” is a word. We have the most advanced communication system in history and nobody talks to anybody anymore.  We have to go to the history books to find the great presidential speeches. Imagine if Lincoln had had Twitter at Gettysburg.

 

Do you remember when you were in grade school?  Every year you’d get a new wooden ruler. It had the Golden Rule on it and was sponsored by Coke.  I went to a public school, so I don’t know if they do that anymore or not, but fifty years later I still remember those rulers.  On the front it said “A good rule…Do unto others as you wouldhave them do unto you.” Then on the back it said compliments of the Coca Cola Bottling Company.”  That was back when public schools and public corporations didn’t mind being associated with the Bible.ruler

For around ten bucks, plus shipping, you can buy one of those rulers on ebay.

But, this isn’t a new thing.  Oh, the technology may be new but sound bites date back to the time before Christ.  In the first reading today Sirach, who wrote from 200-175 BC, or about two centuries before Christ,  gives us four sound bites, three of them about speech.:

“When a sieve is shaken, the husks appear; so do one’s faults when one speaks.”  We may not be familiar with a sieve, but it’s the way they used to separate the grain from the husks.  You’d put the grain in the sieve and shake it. The holes were a certain size and the grain would be separated from the husks.  Sirach is telling us that when we speak our faults fall out of our mouths just like the husks fall out of the sieve.

 

Then he tells us that:  “The fruit of a tree shows the care it has had, so too does ones speech disclose the bent of one’s mind.”  This is a similar message to the first one and finally he says:”Praise no one before he speaks, for it is then that people are tested.”

 

It was either Abraham Lincoln or Mark Twain who said “Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and remove all doubt.”  Same thought, just expressed in a different way.

 

Saint Steven was the first deacon and also the first martyr.  He was stoned to death for preaching the Gospel. They told us in formation that Steven was doing just fine until he opened his mouth.

 

In the middle of the reading, Sirach goes off on a different track and says: “As the test of what the potter molds is in the furnace, so in tribulation is the test of the just.”  If you’ve ever gone to Silver Dollar City, chances you’ve watched the potters at work.  After they complete a piece it goes in the oven to be cured. If the clay isn’t right, the oven will crack it and destroy the piece.  So, tribulation will destroy us if our souls aren’t just.

 

If we turn to Luke’s Gospel, we find Jesus speaking in the same type of sound bite.  “Can a blind person lead a blind person?  Will not both fall into a pit.”  Two thousand years later this saying is part of our language.  How often have you heard someone say “that’s like the blind leading the blind.”  Of course Jesus’ meaning is a little deeper here. He’s not talking about two blind guys falling into a hole.  He’s talking about us following false prophets. How can someone lead you to heaven if they don’t know how to get there themselves.  We see these people on television on Sunday morning, but they’ve been around a lot longer than TV.

 

“No disciple is superior to the teacher but when fully trained, every disciple will be like his teacher.”  That one’s pretty obvious.

 

But then He asks the disciples a question.  “Why do you notice the splinter in your brother’s eye, but do not perceive the wooden beam in your own?”  Think about your basement at home.  Or, if you don’t have a basement, think about the attic.  Think about the wooden beams that hold the whole thing together.  Then imagine one of them sticking out of your eye. Go ahead. I’ll wait.  Got it? OK, now imagine trying to get a splinter out of someone else’s eye with that big beam sticking out of your eye.  You couldn’t even get close enough to see the splinter.

 

YOU HYPOCRITE!  Get your own house in order before you try to help somebody else.  Don’t be like the blind leading the blind.

 

Finally Luke takes us back to Sirach and talks about the quality of the tree producing good fruit.  “A good person out of the store of goodness in his heart produces good but an evil person out of a store of evil produces evil, for out ot the fullness of the heart the mouth speaks.

Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and remove all doubt.

 

Have a great Lent!

 

Southern Baptist leader vows changes

after report alleges widespread abuse.

Let’s be clear about two things right at the outset.  First, I, in no way, mean to diss anyone’s faith tradition.  I was raised in the Southern Baptist Church and have no issue with the 70 million Americans who belong to the church.

Second, any abuse of any child, at any time, any place, by anyone is wrong, wrong, wrong.  There’s no justification for it and there’s certainly no justification for anyone covering it up.

Having said that, I bring this article to your attention for a couple of reasons.  First, it appeared on page 11 A of my local newspaper.  That’s the second-last page of the news section, after the obituaries.  Now maybe I’m getting paranoid, but I can’t help thinking that if the headline had read “Roman Catholic leader vows change”,  this AP article would have appeared on the front page.  Historically any time there’s an article about abuse involving the Catholic Church it always appears on page 1 A.  And any time there’s an article about abuse that doesn’t involve the Church, it gets buried.

The point of the article is that a report by the San Antonio Express-News and Houston Chronicle found about 380 Southern Baptist church leaders and workers who were accused of sexual misconduct since 1998.  Note that year:  1998.  This is recent stuff, folks.  In fact, quoting the article, “In 2008, a victim implored SBC leaders to track sexual predators, act against congregations that harbored or concealed abusers and establish prevention policies such as those adopted by other faiths, including the Roman Catholic Church.  (emphasis mine)  That request was rejected.

The point of this rant is that child sexual abuse is not a Catholic problem.  It’s societal problem that must be addressed by our society.  Have Catholic priests abused children?  There’s no doubt that they have.  But children have also been abused by ministers of other faiths, by teachers, and coaches, and scout leaders.  God help us, they’ve even been molested by their own parents.

The Catholic Church may be the organization best equipped to address this problem, but not as long as we’re thought to be the enemy.  The changes put in place are working.

God Bless America!

I was talking to a friend the other day.  She told me she has started a blog.  I gave her some encouragement and offered to help any way I can.  Then I came home and looked at this blog and realized that I haven’t posted since Memorial Day!  Over a month ago!  If I were an aspiring blogger I would take Deacon Mike’s advice and toss it in the trash can.  I’m embarrassed.

I could make all kinds of excuses for my inactivity but I won’t.  I know better.  This coming November, this blog will be ten years old.  I actually started blogging for my former employer in April 2006, more than twelve years ago.  I think I know how to blog.  I even know how to blog on a regular basis because in my capacity as “professional blogger” I was expected to do it as part of my job.  So, what happened?

Life happened.  Other things seemed to always get in the way.  Believe it or not, these beautiful words of wisdom don’t just flow magically from my fingers.  A good post takes time.  Sometimes a lot of time.

Then there are those fingers themselves.  I’ve developed a neurological condition called Essential Tremor, that causes my hands to shake.  It’s hereditary.  My mom had it too.  Aside from being very aggravating, it makes it very hard to type (or eat).  If I’m going to continue, and I am, I’m going to look into voice recognition software to make this less of a chore.  Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Declaration_Engrav_Pg1of1_doctored_0.jpgBut, as I often do, I digress.  Today is America’s birthday.  242 years ago a brave group of colonists thumbed their noses at King George and declared our independence.  In doing so, they risked everything.  If this experiment had failed they would have lost their families, their homes, and their lives.

Those original Americans had settled along the East Coast.  The thirteen colonies all bordered the Atlantic Ocean.  There’s no way those Founding Fathers could have imagined the vast land we know today as the United States of America.  They had no way of knowing the natural resources that we would enjoy.

God blessed those founders in their efforts and has blessed our country throughout its history.  But today so many of us want to turn our backs on God.  We want Him out of our courthouses and our schools.  So many forget what He has done for us.

There’s a contentious fight over undocumented foreigners coming into our country illegally.  But whichever side of that argument you happen to be on, here’s one incontrovertible fact.  Thousands of people want to come into our country but nobody’s trying to sneak out.  If the President builds a wall, there won’t be any US citizens trying to climb over it.

So, enjoy your freedom.  Enjoy your ability to come and go as you please.  Enjoy the day off from work but don’t forget the reason for the celebration.

Check out this video:

http://a.msn.com/09/en-us/AAzwpfz?ocid=se

Happy (?) Memorial Day

American Flag

Over the weekend I heard someone wish another person “Happy Memorial Day”.  The other person called them out on their greeting saying it was inappropriate for a day set aside to remember our fallen military.  I agree.  There is nothing “happy” about losing one’s life for one’s country.  Brave–yes.  Honorable–most certainly.  But happy–I don’t think so.

Memorial Day (originally Decoration Day) was a state holiday to commemorate those lost in the Civil War.  During World War I, it was decided to honor those who lost their lives in all war.

In 1968, the federal government, in their infinite wisdom, declared Memorial Day to be a federal holiday and moved it to the last Monday in May, effective 1971.  This change meant that the day we were supposed to remember our war dead became a three-day weekend for government workers.

Memorial Day became “Open the pool day”, and “put the boat in the lake day”, and take the kids to Six Flags day”.  It became the first day of summer.  The day set aside as a memorial has become just another summer holiday, a day when we wish someone is “happy”.

I’ll be the first to admit that I managed to avoid the draft during the Viet Nam War.  I had a medical deferment.  I considered myself very lucky.  But, as the years have passed, I believe serving my country would have been good for me.  But, you can’t go back and they certainly don’t want me now.  So today, I go out of my way to thank anyone I see in uniform.  My small parish, Saint Bernadette, is located adjacent to Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery.  I make sure we include a petition for our military men and women at every mass.

jb

Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery

So, on this Memorial Day, please remember what it’s for.  Enjoy your picnic or your family get-together but take time to remember all the men and women who have made the supreme sacrifice so you can enjoy this day of freedom.

God bless the men and women who have died so that we might be free.

Whatever happened to Easter finery?

As a yout’, I worked for a national department store in the “Boys’ Department’.  I’m not sure in this day of political correctness that’s the proper name for it, but what else do you call a department where you sell boys’ clothes?  Anyway, that’s what we called it in the late 60s when there were only two genders.

I thought about those days over the past weekend.  In my department store days, we were slammed the last weekend before Easter and Easter weekend itself.  Every mother wanted to get her male offspring a suit and tie to wear for Easter.  These weren’t wealthy people.  But tradition said that her ten husky had to be properly dressed for Easter Sunday.  Either a two-piece or even a three-piece suit with a new dress shirt and a clip-on tie were absolutely required.  It was a madhouse.

The Easter dressing expedition seemed to be a mother-son affair.  There weren’t a lot of dads around.  The Girls’ Department was on another floor but I assume bedlam reigned there too.  It was a ritual of spring and nobody was immune.  The only people more hassled than the workers in the Boys’ Department were the poor alteration ladies.  Of course, every suit had to be altered in one way or another.  There were no perfect ten huskies.

I got to reminiscing about those days last weekend.  Don’t get me wrong.  Lots of families come to mass on Easter dressed to the nines.  It is the day Jesus was raised from the dead and certainly calls for our best outfits.  But there are some people who just can’t be bothered.  I don’t think it has to do with money.  Some of the blue jeans I saw in church cost more than a pair of dress pants.  The hockey jersey costs just as much as a sports coat.  I think it’s just a sign of the respect we have for one another (and for God).  And as much as I hate to say it, I think it’s more prevalent among Catholics.

There is another side to this argument:  “Would Jesus turn someone away because they weren’t properly dressed?”  No, I don’t believe He would, but that’s not the point.  It’s about respect:  respect for our fellow Catholics, respect for God’s house, and respect for God Himself.

I wonder, if the Holy Father was coming to your parish and you were one of the lucky ones invited to meet him, wouldn’t you dress up?  I think you would.  Well, guess what, Jesus is the Pope’s boss and he’s in every Catholic church every Sunday in the Blessed Sacrament.  Are tank tops and tattered jeans really proper apparel?

While we’re on the subject of disrespectful behavior in church, I offer for your consideration, without comment, this article from the Catholic Herald.

If you don’t want to read the article, watching the following video should be enough.