Thanksgiving

As I sat on the altar this morning I couldn’t help but be impressed by the number of people attending Mass on a Thursday morning that’s not a Holy Day of Obligation, especially with everything else that’s going on in most people’s lives.  For most of us it’s a busy day.

But, obviously, for many of us it’s a special day to give thanks to God for all He’s done for us.  After all, without God we are nothing; We have nothing.  It’s good for us to take a few moments to acknowledge our many gifts.

As Father pointed out in his homily, the word “Eucharist” is from the Greek for “Thanksgiving”.  We give thanks every time we go to mass.

I don’t want to make this long, because, like I said, I know you’re busy.  But I would like to thank you for taking time to read this blog.  I also want to thank my family who put up with me without complaint.  I especially want to thank my wife, Jan, as we begin our 50th year of married life.  We broke all the rules back then.  We were too young.  We hadn’t known each other long enough.  She was Catholic.  I wasn’t.  But somehow we managed to stay together for one year short of half a century.

 

God is good!

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The Feast of All Saints

Are you a minimalist Christian?

You’ve heard the expression “It’s the least I can do.”  I wonder how many of us approach our faith with this expression as our “mission statement”.  What’s the least I can do to get into heaven?

The best example I can think of of this attitude is the question priests and deacons hear all the time regarding Saturday wedding masses.  “Does this count?”  Count??  Count for what?  Of course, we know what they’re asking.  “If I go to this wedding, do I have to go to mass on Sunday?  The bride and groom are going to have a great party and I’d really rather not get up on Sunday morning.”  They’re asking if the Saturday wedding fulfills their “Sunday obligation.

First, let me say I hate the term “Sunday obligation.”  Paying your taxes is an obligation.  Going to work every day is an obligation.  Contributing to the support of the Church is an obligation.  Worshipping the Lord IS NOT AN OBLIGATION.  It’s something we do out of love for our Creator.  Were you listening to the Gospel this Sunday.  “You shall love the Lord, your God, with all your soul, with all your heart, and with all your mind.”

Loving with all your heart is not a minimalist concept.  We have to give Him everything, including our time.  The short answer to the above question is almost always NO.  God works outside of time.  Your so-called Sunday obligation is judged by the week’s readings, not by the time you showed up.  If you didn’t hear the readings for the Thirtieth Sunday of Ordinary Time, you didn’t attend last week’s mass.

Make no mistake, if you love the Lord God, “with all your soul, with all your heart, and with all your mind,” then the concept of a “Sunday obligation” should have no meaning to you.  You should attend mass every Sunday (or Saturday evening) because you want to be there.  What part of the word “all” do you not understand?

Today is All Saints Day, a Holy Day of Obligation.  There’s that word again.  Do you go to mass today out of some sense of obligation, or do you go because you venerate the saints and want to pay tribute to them?  The Church has watered down the concept of Holy Days by moving some of them to Sunday but they are still holy days.  (small h and d)

Advent is coming and Christmas isn’t far behind.  This might be a good time to review your attitude toward the Lord.  The commercials for Christmas stuff have already started.  Let’s not let the commercialism of our Lord’s birthday get in the way of our love for Him.  I’ll say it one more time,

“You shall love the Lord, your God, with all your soul, with all your heart, and with all your mind.”  Now, if you haven’t gone to mass today, turn off your computer and get going.