4th Sunday of Ordinary Time

 

In 1980 a country music singer/songwriter named Mac Davis wrote a song called “Oh Lord, It’s Hard to be Humble.” The song was a big hit on the country charts and on the Top 40 charts, too. It was a parody song. The rest of the first line goes like this. “Oh, Lord, it’s hard to be humble when you’re perfect in every way. Today’s readings all remind us that humility is very important, even though it may be hard.

 

For one thing, we have to understand what humility is. It’s not insecurity. It’s not being unsure of ourselves. Humility is understanding that we were created by God to be part of His plan. We are His coworkers. He’s given each of us our own set of gifts. Humble doesn’t mean we can’t achieve great things. It does mean that we have to give God credit for all the gifts He’s given us.

 

The first reading today begins, “Seek the Lord, all you humble of the earth, who have observed His law; seek justice, seek humility” and maybe you’ll be “sheltered on the day of the Lord’s anger.”

 

In the 2nd reading Paul writes to the Corinthians (and to us) “Not many of you were wise by human standards, not many were powerful, not many were of noble birth.”

 

“Whoever boasts should boast in the Lord.”

 

It’s so easy, especially in our materialistic age, to get caught up in the idea that we’re better than someone else because we’re smarter, or better looking, or because we make more money, have a bigger house and better car.

 

Sure we all want those things, and it’s certainly ok to live in a nice house or drive a nice car if we can afford it. But we have to remember that those things don’t make us better than anybody else. And, if we spend our money on those things and neglect charity to those who don’t have so much, then we have a problem. If you’re driving a Mercedes to mass and putting five bucks in the collection basket every week, you might want to reconsider your priorities.

 

Our faith is full of what seem too be contradictions as we see in today’s Gospel. The famous Beatitudes are one contradictory sentence after another. Jesus tells us that all these people who we see as disadvantaged are really blessed. It’s all about humility. The people Jesus describes have every reason to be humble and for that they will be blessed.

 

If you fall into any of these categories, “Rejoice and be glad, for your reward will be great in heaven.” Be humble because everything you have is a gift from God and it could all be taken away from you in an instant.

 

I think the biggest sin against humility is when we think that we know better than God, or that we can put one over on God. We may be His partners in the Divine Plan, but we’re most definitely junior partners. Sometimes we forget that He sees everything and knows everything. We fall into the trap of sin when we think “just this once won’t hurt. I can take home office supplies from work and nobody’s ever going to know.” There are any number of sins that we might consider “victimless crimes” but whenever we sin there’s always a victim, usually it’s us. When we talk about others behind their backs, we may think we’re building ourselves up by tearing them down, but we’re not. We’re making ourselves look small and God is always listening. Remember “Forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us” is all about humility,

 

Take today’s readings to heart. Appreciate everything God has given us and be ready to share it whenever the need arises. Remember that none of this is our doing. We all have our own gifts and there’s a reason they’re called gifts. They’ve been given to us….freely by a loving Father. If you must boast…boast in the Lord.

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3rd Sunday of Ordinary Time

3rd Sunday of Ordinary Time                        January 22, 2017

You probably know that our weekly readings, our daily readings too, come in sets. They go together. Part of my job, and Father’s job is to figure out why they go together and offer you our words of wisdom, guided by the Holy Spirit. Sometimes it’s hard, especially if we try to put too many of our own ideas into it. Sometimes it’s easy. Today’s readings are easy.

 

In the Gospel, Matthew refers back to the first reading, from the prophet Isaiah. Isaiah tells us, “First the Lord degraded the land of Zebulun
and the land of Naphtali; but in the end he has glorified the seaward road,
the land west of the Jordan, the District of the Gentiles.”

 

In Matthew’s Gospel he tells us that Jesus heard about John’s arrest and “He left Nazareth and went to live in Capernaum by the sea, in the region of Zebulun and Naphtali, that what had been said through Isaiah the prophet
might be fulfilled”.
Jesus glorified Capernaum just by being there.

 

What was Isaiah’s prophesy? “Anguish has taken wing, dispelled is darkness: for there is no gloom where but now there was distress.
The people who walked in darkness have seen a great light; upon those who dwelt in the land of gloom a light has shone.”
Jesus was the light.

 

Sounds familiar, doesn’t it. How many times have we sung the song “City of God?”

 

 Awake from your slumber! Arise from your sleep!
A new day is dawning for all those who weep.
The people in darkness have seen a great light.
The Lord of our longing has conquered the night.

Let us build the city of God.
May our tears be turned into dancing.
For the Lord our light and our love has turned the night into day.

A side note, the song was written by Dan Schutte, a member of the Saint Louis Jesuits, right down the street at Saint Louis U. Ironically, Schutte is no longer a Jesuit.

 

Anyway, we’re seeing here that God can turn dark into light; night into day.

 

In between the first reading and the Gospel we have Paul writing to the Corinthians, complaining about the divisions among them. The Corinthians also seem to be living in darkness. “I urge you, brothers and sisters, in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, that all of you agree in what you say, and that there be no divisions among you, but that you be united in the same mind and in the same purpose.”

 

Is Paul speaking to the Corinthians? Or is he speaking to us? Maybe both. Yesterday we inaugurated a new president and we are definitely a divided country. It’s pretty clear that we’re not heeding Paul’s words. One thing we all need to keep in mind is that Donald Trump is the 45th president of the United States. At most he’ll hold the office for eight years. The REAL leader of our country is hanging up on that cross. He’s the King. He rules everything. Always has…always will. Human leaders serve at His pleasure.

 

God has a plan and we have no idea what it is. All we know is that we’re all part of the plan and it will play itself out according to HIS will, not yours, or mine, or Donald Trump’s. It’s no coincidence that on this inauguration weekend that God tells us, through Saint Paul’s writing, that we must be united in the same purpose.

 

It doesn’t matter if we’re Democrats or Republicans, Christians or Jews, black or white, we must be united in the same mind and the same purpose. The United States is the greatest country in the history of the world, but we’re slipping badly because we’re not listening to God’s word. It’s time that we stopped fighting with one another and worked together for the good of all.

 

“Let us build the city of God.
May our tears be turned into dancing.
For the Lord our light and our love has turned the night into day.”