17th Sunday of Ordinary Time

So, what to say about today’s Gospel, the familiar story of the loaves and the fishes. If you’ve looked at this week’s bulletin, you may have noticed that this miracle is repeated SIX TIMES in the four Gospels. Obviously it’s important. But eventually you begin to run out of things to say about it.

But there is one character in this story who doesn’t get talked about so much. It’s the little boy who contributes the bread and fish in the first place. Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother points out the boy and the fact that he has five barley loaves and two fish. It’s not much, but it’s all he has. Here’s the thing. The kid could have kept the food for himself. He didn’t have to give up his food, especially since he had to know that such a small amount, while it would have been enough for him, isn’t much to feed such a large crowd. Could he have known what Jesus was going to do?

We know that Jesus knew because the Gospel says so. But there’s no way of knowing what was in the boy’s mind.

We don’t know much about the boy. In fact we don’t know anything about him except that he had come to hear Jesus speak and that he was smart enough to bring lunch. We don’t know if he was alone, or if he came with his parents. Maybe he came with some friends. John doesn’t tell us. All we know for sure is that there were 5,000 adults in the crowd and this kid was the only one who planned ahead. And we know that he was willing to give all he had, little as it might have been, to help feed the others. He couldn’t have known that his small amount of bread and fish would be more than enough to feed everyone.

When we look at this story, we usually focus on the miracle. Jesus fed the multitude with a small amount of food and had enough left over to fill twelve wicker baskets, one for each Apostle. It’s definitely a story worth retelling over and over. Jesus performed a great miracle which, of course, is the precursor of the Eucharist. But it wouldn’t have happened without the generosity of this unnamed boy.

Which brings us to our Eucharistic meal that Father will prepare in just a few minutes. There’s a reason why someone from the congregation brings up the bread and wine. It’s representative of today’s Gospel story. Father will turn YOUR gifts into Christ’s Body and Blood, just as he fed the 5,000 with the young man’s bread and fish.

But, wait! There’s more! At the same time you bring up the gifts of bread and wine, you also bring up your monetary gifts. We can’t celebrate the Eucharist without bread and wine and we can’t celebrate the Eucharist without your gifts of time, talent, and treasure. Like most things in the Church, the offertory is symbolic. You could mail in your contribution. Many people do. Some churches use on-line giving. We’re not there yet, but some day we may be. We get money from other sources, like weddings and dinners, but it’s the offertory procession, you’re bringing the bread, the wine, and your financial gifts that signifies your generosity. It’s a reminder that the word communion comes from the same root as community. Father consecrates your bread and wine and we celebrate a meal together.

Jesus could have sent the Apostles off to the grocery store to get fish and bread. But He didn’t. He allowed an anonymous boy to provide the material for the miracle. In the same way, Father and I could just bring the bread and wine out of the sacristy for Holy Communion and we could ask you to mail us your tithe. But we don’t. Your gift to the Church is returned as Jesus’ gift to you.

So, as the ushers take up the collection today, remember that it’s your gifts that make this meal possible. Without your presence and your gifts there would be no Eucharist. Like the unnamed little boy, you make the meal possible.

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